What Is Mental Health, Simplified

Mental Health is a much wider, diverse subject than many actually realise and whilst it can be very confusing at the more in-depth scientific end, that which the majority of us need to understand, is relatively straight forward and only made more complicated by…us!

We ALL have Mental Health the same as we have Physical Health, it is important that we take care with our use of terminology connected to this subject and understand the impact that incorrect use may have to an individual. Mental Wellbeing is how we look after our minds and that which impacts our minds, on a daily basis.

What Is Mental Health?

  • Mental health is part of our overall health. It’s about:
  • How we feel, think, and behave
  • How we cope with the ups and downs of everyday life
  • How we feel about ourselves and our life
  • How we see ourselves and our future
  • How stress affects us
  • How we deal with negative events
  • Our self-esteem and confidence

We ALL have Mental Health the same as we have Physical Health, it is important that we take care with our use of terminology connected to this subject and understand the impact that incorrect use may have to an individual. Mental Wellbeing is how we look after our minds and that which impacts our minds, on a daily basis. Someone has a Mental Illness on receiving a clinical diagnosis of Stress, Depression, Anxiety Disorders, Psychosis.

Mental Health Simplified

What Is Mental Health?

How we feel, think, and behave
How we cope with the ups and downs of everyday life
How we feel about ourselves and our life
How we see ourselves and our future
How stress affects us
How we deal with negative events
Our self-esteem and confidence

Types of Typical Mental Illnesses

Someone has a Mental Illness on receiving a clinical diagnosis for any of the myriad of illnesses and it should be noted that typically, when someone is diagnosed for one illness, then they could also have the symptoms of another. For example, I have Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression and elements of Generalised Anxiety Disorder, though the driving illness for me is the CPTSD.

The following are your typical, more well-known mental illnesses, along with a little explanation for you, should you wish to learn more, then we do run general mental health online training, so contact me now for more details, for now though;

Stress

There are many definitions of stress, however, Stress is your body’s way of responding to any kind of demand. It can be caused by both good and bad experiences and when people feel stressed by something going on around them, their bodies react by releasing chemicals into the blood. It is said that there is typically ‘Good’ and ‘Bad’ stress, some people are most productive when they are put under pressure and in highly stressful situations, however, when stress is having a negative impact on your life at work, home, in relationships, financially and even physically, for a consistent period of time, then it is time to take action.

Depression

An illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts and that affects the way a person eats, sleeps, feels about themselves and thinks about things. Depression is not the same as a passing blue mood, it can be extremely debilitating and does not simply pass over night, so those with a clinical diagnosis of depression cannot merely ‘pull themselves together’ and get better. It is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be wished away. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months or years, though it should also be noted that even when therapy is sought and begins, on average it takes twenty six weeks at one session per week, before someone is in a place where they consider themselves as recovered. There are some who don’t recover fully, having to learn how to manage their symptoms, requiring support from management within places of work.

Anxiety Disorders

A serious mental illness that causes significant worry or fear that doesn’t go away and may even get worse over time. We all feel anxious at times, but with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety tends to be fairly constant, having a very negative and intrusive impact on a person’s quality of life, with very debilitating symptoms.

Psychosis

It’s a symptom of serious mental disorders. People who are experiencing psychosis may have either hallucinations, thought disorders or delusions. Hallucinations are sensory experiences that occur within the absence of an actual stimulus.

The Importance of Self-Management

I will make the assumption that everyone knows and accepts that Prevention is better than cure. Now whilst there is currently no guarantee of our own ability to prevent anyone from gaining a mental illness, there certainly are extremely powerful steps that we can take, to help reduce the chances of it happening to ourselves. This involves us learning about self-management or in many cases it is a point of our re-educating ourselves in how to do the most simplest of things, which in itself all becomes part of our self-management shield.

When I was still working at Wellbeing360, we developed a model and training course called the ‘3Selves’ which consisted of three simple elements: Self-Awareness, Self-Care and Self-Help, which on the face of it might seem very basic and straightforward, BUT, that IS the whole point! Tackling mental ill-health and reducing the possibilities of being diagnosed as having a mental illness, CAN be very basic, simple and straightforward, though we DO need to learn how to live again as wonderfully unique human beings. Oh and the 3Selves course isn’t really that basic if you have never looked inside yourself before, though I guarantee that you WILL feel totally empowered afterwards, go check it out.

Obviously mental health impacts our daily lives in a number of ways and as you have learned from the above video, it is continuously fluid, meaning we ALL move around the spectrum and more importantly, even should someone have a mental illness diagnosis, this does not prevent them from managing the symptoms and operating at a level equal to or indeed above that of their peers.

From here though, when it comes to learning anymore it really does depend what your specific area of interest is? If it is more for yourself, then visit our Individual Mental Health page to further your own knowledge, which I highly recommend, OR if it’s a case of learning more about it from a HR, L&D and employer viewpoint, then visiting our Workplace Mental Health page, is more for you.

Should you have any specific questions that these pages do not answer, maybe there’s not enough detail or relate to your own unique situation, then you can always reach out to me, in fact I encourage it, then I will assist you in any which way I can.

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